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Counterfactuals and relevant policy: the case of Iraq and Afghanistan

By Jo and David When we talk about the relevance of history to policy, we are frequently asked to point to specific decisions that might have been different had historians been i… http://historymanifesto.cambridge.org/blog/2014/10/counterfactuals-and-relevant-policy-case-iraq-and-afghanistan/

Who should read The History Manifesto?

Is this book for you?
By David and Jo Historians, first and foremost, but probably students more than their teachers. Other practitioners of the human sciences with a historical bent: sociologists, ec… http://historymanifesto.cambridge.org/blog/2014/09/who-should-read-history-manifesto/

Why Open Access Publication for The History Manifesto?

Why The History Manifesto became Cambridge University Press's first open access title.
By David and Jo Even two or three years ago, most academics in the humanities, and certainly most members of the non-academic public, had not heard much if anything about the Ope… http://historymanifesto.cambridge.org/blog/2014/09/why-open-access-publication-history-manifesto/

Why The History “Manifesto”?

The origin of the book title.
By David and Jo We played around with various titles for the book but the one that stuck, at least by the time we wrote the proposal, was The Historicist Manifesto—on the analogy… http://historymanifesto.cambridge.org/blog/2014/09/why-history-manifesto/

Why Did You Write The History Manifesto?

The authors of The History Manifesto explain their inspiration.
By David and Jo There’s no easy answer to the question of why we wrote The History Manifesto. But let’s play Fernard Braudel’s game and think of three different time-scales which… http://historymanifesto.cambridge.org/blog/2014/09/why-did-you-write-history-manifesto/